On Being A Child of God

teddy bears

I had been gone for a particularly long and exhausting day. When I walked in the door all four of my children and my wife were occupied.

My oldest child was reading a book. One of them was playing on an iPod and another with a toy while my wife was making dinner. All good things.

My youngest daughter, who is only 18 months old, was the only one who acknowledged that I had come in and she did so in a thrilling way.

She squealed. Then she dropped her toy and ran towards me. She wrapped her tiny arms around my legs and refused to let go.

I’ll be honest, I felt like a million bucks.

In that split second I heard in my head, “that is how Jesus wants you to see and enjoy Him.”

 

Jesus said, “…unless you are converted and become like little children, you will not enter the kingdom of heaven.” (Matthew‬ ‭18‬:‭3‬ MEV)

Teenagers and adult children often dislike the company of their parents and willfully avoid them. Little children are thrilled to see their parents.

“become like little children”

Teenagers and adult children will argue with their parents and challenge their beliefs and assertions. Little children believe everything their parents say.

“become like little children.”

Teenagers and adult children often want special events or occasions to spend time with their parents. Little children just want to be next to their parents all the time, or on their lap.

“become like little children.”

Teenagers and adult children tend to do their own thing, often without regard for their parents wishes. Little children will often do whatever they’re asked to do. All they want is to please their parents.

“become like little children.”

Teenagers and adult children want to do things on their own and try to figure out their way to accomplish goals and meet needs. Little children just grab their parents hand and hold on.

“become like little children.”

Teenagers and adult children worry and stress over needs, responsibilities and the future. Little children don’t worry about anything. They completely trust their parents to provide everything they need.

“become like little children.”

Teenagers and adult children only request reasonable things that wouldn’t seem an imposition of their parents. Little children believe their parents are able to make their wildest dreams come true. As a result, they ask for anything and everything, believing their parents will supply.

“become like little children.”

Teenagers and adult children develop personality traits that make it difficult to get along with family members and causes disagreements from time to time. Little children often love everybody and offer a smile to anyone who looks their way.

“become like little children.”

What would our world look like?

What would the church look like?

What would your family look like?

What would your heart look like?

What if we were to trust Him thoroughly, obey Him completely, worship Him singularly and love Him wholeheartedly.

What if we all were to “become like little children” and look at God as the good Father that He is.

Balance or Yes & No

wooden fenceIt’s not that we don’t know right from wrong. We do. We simply all too often make either emotional or reckless decisions in a moment of weakness, hunger or fatigue.

We know right from wrong, we just don’t know how to prioritize right from wrong.

Most of our selfish and reckless decisions are sourced from the fact that our priorities are fluid. We haven’t decided, before we are presented with a decision, what our values and priorities dictate. Your greatest weapon in achieving your goals is deciding before hand what you say yes to and what you say no to and then being intentional about sticking with those principles.

Even if, however, you are able to do that, there is then the difficulty of choosing between good things and better things. As Jim Collins so aptly presented to us, The enemy of great is good enough.

It is those reasons that make balance one of the most important things necessary for a healthy life spiritually, mentally, emotionally, and physically. We are only one person, and our mind and spirit and intellect must do everything they will do in the only physical body we will ever have. An imbalance in any of those areas will affect who you are as a person.

The state of your body affects your mind and the state of your spirit affects your body. There’s only one way to disconnect your mind, body and spirit from each other. It’s called death.

So as long as you are alive, and as long as you intend to pursue physical, spiritual and emotional health, you’re going to have to learn to find balance. That will require you learning when to say, “Yes” and when to say, “No”.

As much as we would like to convince ourselves otherwise, there is no neutrality in life. We make choices every day. Not making a choice is a choice in itself. Everything you say “yes” to also means a thousand other options you said “no” to. Everywhere you are is a myriad of places you aren’t. Everything you receive defines the things you reject and vice versa.

Learning the power of saying “Yes” and “No” to the right things is key to achieving balance.

The great power of Christianity is that, for most of us, If we get God in His rightful place everything else effortlessly lines up. The truth is, it’s not so much us putting God in His rightful place ( He’s already there) as it is us placing ourselves in our proper place under Him. When we realign our will with His will we find ourselves in the peace that is promised in His Spirit.

Sometimes we’re afraid to say no to some people and things because it often feels harsh and severe. We would like to be seen as nice people, as being kind. But sometimes saying no is the kindest, most important thing you can do for yourself, your family or another person.

Often, we can be very cruel in our intents to be kind. It’s not kindness to continue to enable individuals to self destruct. It’s not kindness to fatigue your own mind and body to such a degree that you rob yourself of rest and your family of your complete presence. Often the kindest thing we could do is learn to say, “No”.

Sadly, it is often the little things that end up being our real problems. It turns out, you really should sweat the small stuff because often the big stuff is simply an aggregate of the small stuff that we didn’t properly sweat. Our priorities were fluid, our values unsettled, and, because of that, we didn’t know when to say yes or when to say no. The little stuff aggregates and then we have a big problem.

John Piper says in his book, A Hunger For God,

“The greatest enemy of hunger for God is not poison but apple pie. It is not the banquet of the wicked that dulls our appetite for heaven, but endless nibbling at the table of the world. It is not the X-rated video, but the prime-time dribble of triviality we drink in every night. For all the ill that Satan can do, when God describes what keeps us from the banquet table of his love, it is a piece of land, a yoke of oxen, and a wife (Luke 14:18-20).

The greatest adversary of love to God is not his enemies but his gifts. And the most deadly appetites are not for the poison of evil, but for the simple pleasures of earth. For when these replace an appetite for God himself, the idolatry is scarcely recognizable, and almost incurable.”

Airplanes need two wings, and both are necessary to stay in the air. People have two legs, one to remain planted while the other one moves, enabling us to walk forward or backward. Roads have two sets of lanes, each going in opposite directions. The truth is, you need Yes and No to achieve balance in life.

Yes to God. Yes to good things. Yes to rest. Yes to faith.

No to the tyranny of the urgent. No to good things that rob from better things. No to exhaustion.

Learning how to use Yes and No is one of the greatest skills you will refine in your pursuit of balance.

Simplicity

I tried recently to set up a new laptop and wireless network for a PC user, who will remain unnamed. I was quickly reminded why I have the enthusiasm I do for my mac. In a word, simplicity.

After three failed attempts to setup the network the PC suggested I call customer service. I did so and their automated system disconnected me, not once, not twice, but three times. I was finally successful at getting everything the way we wanted it, but not without great frustration and a bitten lip.

I readily admit, I don’t understand PC’s. Frankly, I don’t think anyone does. I know the tech guys at Staples act like they do, with their fancy words and their complicated Microsoft jargon. But they don’t really know. No one does. How else do you explain Vista?

I walked away quickly, joyfully, thankfully, from that Acer laptop ever so grateful to return to the waiting trackpad of my friendly, efficient Macbook. They’re just so…there’s no words, it’s just better.

It’s just better with a Mac. They’re simple, clean and efficient. I think it’s the simplicity that draws me into the fellowship of other mac lovers. All I’ve ever used, since I was 14 years old, is an Apple product. I once backslid for about a year in an ill advised fling with a cheap Compaq laptop that proved itself as dependable as a leaky rowboat. My conversion is complete. Yes, I even have the apple sticker on the back of my foreign car. As much as is within my power, I’ll always use a mac.

Life is complicated enough. I don’t need my computer to join the fray.

I feel myself being drawn, in nearly every aspect of my life, to those things that offer the most simplicity. I don’t think I am alone. Trend watchers will tell you that there is a paradigm shift occurring in our culture from the complicated and complex to the simple and the organic.

From business models to education plans, cell phones to computers, there is a rebellion occurring and complexity is being thrown out of office. Complexity has two ugly children; reduced efficiency and higher costs. Complicated, demanding systems are often pretentious, affected and incredibly inefficient. They tend to marginalize participants and, when they’re “fleshed out”, end up serving the system rather than the purpose for which the system exists. I realize these are grand generalizations but as I talk with friends I find this sentiment echoed with increasing frequency.

The office superstore Staples struck a chord with their “easy button” marketing campaign. People are exhausted with complex, convoluted, difficult systems. We want things to be simple again.

Complexity is being replaced with simplicity. There’s something very appealing about simple things. Simple chords, simple words, simple acts, simple machines. Simple lives. Life is so complex it overwhelms most of us. Tax codes and instructions, manuals, procedures, red tape, bureaucracy, policy and applications. Why? Why can’t things just be simple?

I think they can. I think they are. Things are changing and the world is beginning to arc towards simplicity. A wonder amongst it all is the Gospel of Jesus Christ. It has been beautifully simple since Jesus first came.

“Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” (Matthew 11:28-30 ESV)

I love that. He said, “I’m easy”. There is nothing simpler or more compelling than what Jesus Christ offers.