Respecting The Paint

yellow stripes roadAccording to the United States Department of Transportation there are almost 247 million registered motor vehicles navigating over 5 million miles of roadway in America. That’s an average of 50 cars per mile.

I willfully try not to think about these numbers, nor the caliber or condition of individuals operating these motor vehicles, while I am on the road. The next time you take a trip across town try not to think about the hundreds of careless, teenaged, distracted, medicated and inebriated drivers piloting tons of high speeding steel all around you and in oncoming lanes!

Considering all this most American drivers wouldn’t dare venture into this potential tumult of vehicular chaos. Amazingly however, we do, every day, and with great confidence.

We’ve come to know, through experience, that driving a car is not as dangerous as it sounds or potentially could be.

The U.S. Department of Transportation confirms that finding by reporting a mere 1.75 million vehicle collisions each year. Though the number itself is large it amounts to less than 1% of all vehicles on the road and fails to fulfill the previously discussed potential for mayhem.

The truly amazing thing, is that all this is made possible by paint. On very few roads in America and on most highways there are little to no barriers preventing vehicles from colliding into each other much less keeping them from erratic and reckless behavior. The only thing maintaining order and preventing chaos on the interstates, highways and Main Streets of The United States are six inch stripes of yellow and white paint.

The rules of the road are among the few remaining absolutes western civilization still respects. We’ve been taught from the beginning of our driving careers to respect the rules of the road and, if all drivers would do so, it will guarantee safety as we travel. Previously cited Department of Transportation statistics demonstrate that the majority of American drivers respect the paint.

Recently the state highway passing through our town was repaved with expected government speed and efficiency. There were a few days, as they were completing the project, when there were no stripes on the fresh asphalt. Yet there were no accidents or collisions during those few days. It wasn’t that the road was less driven or easier to navigate. It was actually more difficult to drive that highway because it was reduced to one lane in many places. In the absence of stripes however, drivers knew where the lines should be and piloted their vehicles accordingly.

There was a time in western thought that the lines and stripes of God’s law and order were the prevalent worldview. Even in their absence we could act accordingly. No longer is this true. We’ve lost the ability to navigate life with even a remembrance of where the lines were and what they meant. We no longer respect God or His order as worthy of our consideration.

We’re expected to take for granted that reason and logic have stepped into the discussion and proven God to be an unreliable theory. The prevailing notion today is that science has laid to rest the naive simplicity of faith in God.
As a result of our cultures rejection of God we’ve become thoroughly secular. We allow no room for the sacred in our culture or families and we reject moral absolutes choosing rather to embrace moral relativism. The only time we allow for moral absolutes is when we perceive an injustice against ourselves and only then will we claim there to be anything morally definite.

We accept the notion that there is no objective moral standard nor a moral lawgiver that any man is required to live by until an athlete or an actor violates his contract, uses narcotics or is caught in a lie and then we are incredulous! There is no such thing as a moral compass until a state governor commits adultery, misappropriates funds, or lies under oath and then we find ourselves asserting once again that there indeed is a moral order to life that we must follow.

We have lived as if there were no stripes on the road and then, when chaos follows, we scratch our heads and wonder aloud, “what’s wrong with the world?”. We are paying a high price for rejecting God.

I believe the analogy of a striped road is a good example of the inequity that exists in popular thought towards God. Our practice betrays our logic.

Why do we obey the rules of the road? Because a book told us we should? What does that book know about where I’m going and how I’m going to get there? It was written by men who are nothing like me and printed years ago by people that don’t understand how I drive and where I need to go.

Times have changed! We have GPS now, backup cameras and parking assist controls. We don’t need to be burdened with our grandfathers’ outdated ideas of how to pilot a vehicle. That may have been what they needed to safely drive their old Studebakers and trucks but we don’t live in that world anymore.

Furthermore, how do I know I can trust the men who striped the roads themselves? Are they not men, capable of mistakes and failures? I don’t think I want to submit myself to some random officials anachronistic idea of how and where I should drive. I’ll drive where ever and how ever I want to drive.

While any clear thinking individual would find these lines of thinking laughable, not to mention reckless, we employ the same faulty logic and vacant objections towards faith in God.

When a drunk driver speeds all over town, running red lights and stop signs and eventually slams into a school bus killing several children we are shocked and horrified. Yet when we ignore the principles God has established to maintain blessing and health in our life we see no connection between our behavior and its result.

Marriage is not held sacred, life is treated cheaply, we abuse our bodies with drugs and alcohol, we maintain carnal and selfish lifestyles, subsidize poverty, avoiding God, His Word and His order and then shake our fist at God when things go wrong and blame Him for all the evil in the world. We’ve ignored the stripes He painted and then claim the disaster that’s come from our reckless behavior proves God can’t be real, good or both.

In short, we’ve asked God to let us do whatever we want and then we blame Him for the consequences or worse, claim the results prove His vacancy. We deny the viability of faith in God based, not upon experience or reason but rather, upon the choices and actions of men.

Those who have faith in God and in His Word have been plagued for centuries by questions meant to erode their faith through reason and logic. Some call themselves atheists, some agnostic others simply adopt the benign term “skeptic”.

Whatever they may be called, their questions have been around as long as faith has been professed. A faith in God and the Holy Bible as His Word does not allow room for indifference or neutrality. The demands and claims of the Bible concerning God and His laws require action and response. It is my belief that most people who deny God do so, not because of some logical or rational exercise, but rather because they are simply not willing not respond to the call of scripture.

Reason does not stand in the way of faith. In fact, now more than ever before, philosophy and the sciences point with increasing uniformity to a world that is complex, orderly and bears the fingerprint of a designer. From the anthropic principle to the fine tuning of the cosmological constants such as gravity, our world resonates with the echoes of a designer. It’s as if every blade of grass and drop of water is preaching, “There is a God!”

It was the Apostle Paul who said, “the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things which are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse” (Romans 1:20). He went on to say that once they knew God yet did not honor Him their hearts were darkened and “professing themselves to be wise, they became fools” (Romans 1:22).

Our society mocks faith in Christ and the Holy Bible as God’s divinely inspired Word as illegitimate and unfounded while at the same time expressing blind faith in the world that surrounds us every day.

I learned many interesting things in the two and a half years I worked as a pharmacy technician. One of the most commercially successful pain relievers on the market is acetaminophen, often branded as Tylenol. It was approved for use in 1951 but remarkably, after over 60 years of use the “mechanism of action remains unknown”. We know that acetaminophen works, we simply do not know how. Yet our ignorance of exactly how this drug works has not hindered us from taking it or giving it to our children. We’ve found it works when we use it so we trust our experience more than the argument.

We trust a chemical into our bodies that the people who produce it and regulate it admit they do not know exactly how it works. Yet when asked to trust centuries of experience and reliability in the laws of God we become incredulous.

Our logic is failing and we know it. We have reasoned our way out of God’s order and consequently the benefits it brings.

I believe we have reached a time in history when this is becoming increasingly clear. The way we’ve been living isn’t working. We’re ready for a change. The question is, do we have good reason to believe?

Why is it okay to engage in every imaginable alternative lifestyle and count all belief systems and ideologies valid and acceptable except Christianity? Why is Christianity singled out as the only insufferable faith?

If pain is such a problem in human existence how is there so much goodness in the world? How can we even understand evil without the existence of God?

Why do so many people have a problem with Christianity in specific? How does the atheist account for Christianity’s survival through the centuries?

What about the believer’s personal testimony? Are all people of faith guilty of perjury by default or is there any merit to their testimony? Have we reached a point, intellectually and spiritually, where we must rethink everything we know?

We’ve driven on unstriped roads for too long. I believe these questions, among others, are worthy of our consideration. I believe if we ask enough questions we will eventually find that we do indeed have reason to believe.

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